Add Naseum

After a few hours of playing Undertale and Shovel Knight with my friend Noah, something interesting came up in conversation. “Have Nintendo taken longer to release games recently?” he asked me. I didn’t know how to respond with the information I had, so I made a series of hypotheses. The first and most obvious thought was that yes; if you feel they have slowed down then Occam’s Razor trims our assumptions down to that feeling when no other evidence is present. The second and less obvious solution was that Nintendo have only slowed down their game releases in comparison to the rest of the industry which, through recycled game engines and assets, moves at a breakneck speed. In order to put these theories to the test, I created a spreadsheet that shows all North American release dates within the Legend of Zelda and platforming Mario series in chronological order. If you would like to view this spreadsheet it’s been made available here. A number of intriguing thoughts emerge from these release statistics.

Most prominently, Nintendo has NOT slowed its development of new Mario games and in fact has only increased the pace of its releases since 2005, which marks the beginning of my data for the “modern” Nintendo era. In fact, with staggered releases between consoles and handhelds, Nintendo have released Mario games within 3 to 9 months of each other relatively consistently. Despite their tendency to lag behind other companies in terms of hardware capabilities, Nintendo have picked up the oldest adages in corporate business, “If it ain’t broke, keep selling it.” and more importantly, “Reduce, reuse, recycle.” My conservative and outlier free estimates place the increase of pace at about 6 months faster while those estimates that include the outliers place it at a staggering 10 months faster! Either way, there’s more of Mario to go around these days, which may not sound as great to Princess Peach as it does to Nintendo’s core audience. An audience, I might add, who were even happy to purchase what could easily pass as a development tool being used by Nintendo to craft the games they were already buying. The Legend of Zelda game releases are quite a bit different.

Super Mario Maker
To play or to make, that is the question. (Image credit to Nintendo’s official Mario home page)

It’s not surprising that entries into a crafted, artistic series like the Legend of Zelda take longer to make than Mario’s platforming escapades, but how long is too long? The Legend of Zelda poses a problem to this particular analysis because of the exclusion of the Phillips CD-i releases. These exclusions seem to be the cause of anomalously elongated release waits of up to 65 months! Including these outliers, it would appear that the Legend of Zelda games have seen marginally faster releases, only by about 2 months, in the modern era. Without these outliers, the metric I choose to utilize for the sake of this analysis, modern Zelda releases have slowed down by an enormous factor of 6 months. The results in terms of speed are arguable, but either way they fail to support a hypothesis of consistent stagnation in Nintendo releases. The anomalies in the Legend of Zelda series are of much more interest to me.

Both lags in release marked the first Zelda game on a new console and a brand new direction for the series as a whole. A Link to the Past was released on November 21, 1991 and featured a much more centralized story, an alternate world, and many other mainstays in the franchise. It is widely regarded as the best of the 2D Zelda games and perhaps the best game in the series as a whole. The second lagging release, and the longest wait for Zelda game to ever take place, happened before the first groundbreaking 3D Zelda title: Ocarina of Time. Both games released after considerable Zelda dry spells, on the same day, and to thunderous critical and commercial applause. While I’m not suggesting these two games aren’t the masterpieces many claim them to be, it might be wise to consider the environment, marketing, social condition, and fan base at the time of release. Perhaps those dry spells allowed these particular titles to flourish, or perhaps the extra development time truly did go a long way. Either way, Nintendo is still profiting off of titles like these today, and I personally find it doubtful that their newer, swiftly developed Mario titles with discover the same nostalgic power in their own old age.

Ocarina of Time Logo
Widely acclaimed as one of the best Zelda games, and games, of all time! (Image credit to IGN’s board discussion of Ocarina of Time VS A Link to the Past)

What do you think? Is a quicker development pace good for the industry and gamers alike or do the best titles require careful, lengthy, and deliberate planning? Do you enjoy getting hyped for a far off game release, or would you rather have the fun within your reach pronto? Let us know in the comments below!

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Author: Shane Nichols

Co-founder and blogger at Birb Friends. I like a variety of games and celebrate game design that uses game mechanics to tell stories. You can catch me writing comparison posts, in depth game reviews, and game design articles, as well as with Noah Stites in our YouTube let's play show TheDPadShow.

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