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Why You’re Wrong About Pokemon: Let’s Go Pikachu! / Let’s Go Eevee!

New changes to the Pokemon formula are set to make the games better than ever for everybody.

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Pokemon: Let's Go Pikachu! and Let's Go Eevee!
(Image credit to Nintendo and The Pokemon Company, retrieved from Nintendo’s official Pokemon: Let’s Go Pikachu! and Let’s Go Eevee! product page.)

Nintendo has attempted a homerun and struck out at the home plate as always… at least according to their most avid fans. The recently announced Pokemon: Let’s Go Pikachu! and Pokemon: Let’s Go Eevee!, releasing November 16th on Switch, is a spin-off from the main series set in the Kanto region that focuses on its special interaction with the wildly popular, albeit shortly popular, Pokemon GO. To facilitate this interaction and draw players from Pokemon GO into this new console adventure, gameplay mainstays have been radically changed to fit alongside Pokemon GO’s mechanics. The disappointed, at best, and vehement, at worst, responses amassing under IGN’s truncated version of Nintendo Treehouse’s Pokemon: Let’s Go Pikachu! and Pokemon: Let’s Go Eevee! video exploration tell the tale of what “Nintendo got wrong this time“, and the consensus says two things: the removal of wild Pokemon battles, and the experience sharing between all Pokemon. As always, this consensus doesn’t consider the whole picture.

IGN Video - Comment Reponses
(Image credit to Youtube, IGN, and the respective authors, retrieved by Birb Friends. Any desire of the authors that their comment be removed should be submitted through Birb Friends’ contact page.)

These new spinoff games have some interesting changes from the main series. They’re the first main series’ styled Pokemon games to feature fully integrated cooperative play into the central storyline. They’re also the first to allow two of your Pokemon to travel alongside you outside of their pokeballs, although main series titles like Pokemon Yellow and Pokemon HeartGold allowed one Pokemon to do so. Pokemon that travel outside their pokeballs are also actual size for the first time in the series, and certain Pokemon,  like Onyx, will be rideable. Beyond that, wild Pokemon encounters have turned into Pokemon GO encounters, so instead of weakening Pokemon through battle, you’ll entice them in with fruits and other objects before throwing a pokeball to capture them by using the JoyCon. These wild encounters still give your Pokemon experience, but instead of giving your Pokemon experience upon defeating a wild Pokemon, you’re given experience for capturing them. Additionally, wild Pokemon are visible moving about in the grass instead of only appearing during encounters, and differently colored auras surrounding these Pokemon display whether they are larger or smaller for their species. The Pokemon Box, which used to be accessible only in Pokemon Centers is now available in the player’s trainer bag, and Pokemon can be sent from the Pokemon Box to Professor Oak to gain candies that train your Pokemon’s stats. Finally, Pokemon you have in Pokemon GO can be transferred to a Pokemon GO Park area in place of the Safari Zone of previous generations.

This is, admittedly, a shockingly large number of changes in a single generation for the Pokemon series, but in a series commonly derided for being the same reskinned game sold time after time after time to children who don’t know any better, that may not be a bad thing. Let’s tackle these changes one by one. First off, the addition of a cooperative player has not fallen under scrutiny: it’s generally considered a great addition and with good reason. Players of this new Pokemon game can be younger, experience the game together, and learn from each other in a far more personable and natural way than ever before. As for having your Pokemon travel alongside you outside their pokeballs, the presence of this addition in previous versions gave the player a sense of comradery, bonding, and adventure that wasn’t matched in newer entries like Pokemon Sun and Moon that substituted virtual pet style grooming in its place. That is, of course, not to mention the way Pokemon freely traveling beside you makes the trainer/Pokemon relationship seem more mutual and caring as well as matching the anime adventures! This addition also faces little scrutiny in the community, but the transformation of wild Pokemon encounters into Pokemon GO encounters faced more backlash than it could ever warrant.

There’s nothing inherently wrong with preferring wild Pokemon battles to Pokemon GO encounters unless you intend to moralize the brutalizing of virtual, fake animals (which is a fine thing to do, in my opinion), but there’s nothing inherently right about including wild Pokemon battles in every Pokemon game. Though it may be difficult to fight the urge to resist any change in a beloved, nostalgic childhood series, some changes, like this one, can be good. Pokemon GO encounters force Pokemon to live up to its catchphrase, “Gotta catch ’em all!”, for the first time. In Pokemon: Let’s Go Pikachu and Let’s Go Eevee, players are rewarded, both with experience points and with the ability to customize their Pokemon’s stats (which would normally require rigorous, specific, and researched EV training), when they capture wild Pokemon. Surely, this is an improvement over a simple Pokedex entry that few ever read, right? I, for one, was elated by the change. The experience sharing may seem like a bad choice at first glance, deincentivizing the use of many different Pokemon in battle, but it actually counteracts the incentive to use a single Pokemon. Anyone who played Pokemon at a younger age should remember always using their starter Pokemon and how attached they became to their starter. By forcing experience points to be shared, this new game makes the hyperpowered starter Pokemon disappear, making battles more than brute force. And, if that brute force is ever needed, a helping hand in the form of a cooperative player is always at the ready.

As for Pokemon visibly moving about in the grass, this will give players a chance to avoid encounters they don’t want while enlivening the areas they traverse and giving them fresh experiences each time they pass through. Additionally, the size auras tip players off that a Pokemon in the grass is special and, though this is only speculation, may indicate IV values for those Pokemon as well. With the increased rate of Pokemon capture, moving the Pokemon Box to a player’s bag makes sense as well: accessing it will become a part of the grinding experience that would be tedious if the player had to go to the Pokemon Center every time. Finally, the Pokemon GO Park is the feature equivalent of a cherry on top. Pokemon GO players will love it, and non-Pokemon GO players don’t have to use it and can even be supplemented by friends who play the phone game.

Overall, most of these changes and additions won’t just make Pokemon a game with a clearer focus both on battling AND on Pokemon collecting, but will also make Pokemon a more accessible, shareable, cleanly designed, and unique experience for everyone. The Pokemon Company has clearly put their ear to the ground and took inspiration from what has worked in the past, whether it be the traveling Pokemon companions of Pokemon Yellow or the Pokewalker being reborn in the new Pokeball+ peripheral, to make something entirely fresh and innovative, yet familiar at the same time. Nintendo may strike out often, but sometimes its fans can make bad calls, too.

Featured

Birb Friends Series: Thinking With Portals

A new video article series on Valve’s Portal is coming to Birb Friends!

Thinking With Portals
(Image credit to Valve Corporation, retrieved from IGDB.com’s Portal Press Kit)

      Hello Birbies! I know it’s been a long time, but new content is coming very very soon! I’m proud to announce a game design analysis series on Valve’s monumentally successful Half-Life spinoff, Portal! I’ll be taking a look at all aspects of Portal, from GlaDOS’s quips and the visual design to the implications of the portal gun itself, in Birb Friends’ first ever video article series: Thinking With Portals. Each chamber will have its own dedicated article so we can delve as deep as possible into the choices that make up the game and its design. While this will be a look at the original Portal game in isolation, assuming the player jumped in without playing the other games included in the Orange Box, which was a video game compilation box including some of Valve’s best titles like Half-Life 2 and Team Fortress 2, there’s still much to be gleaned from its design both as a literary work and as a monument of game design. So stay tuned for more information in the coming week if you’d like to start Thinking With Portals!

The Dollar Debate: Cost Per Hour In Video Games

Green Man Gaming inflamed the video game review world with its cost per hour metric, but it’s not really a bad idea.

Green Man Gaming Logo
(Image Credit to Green Man Gaming, retrieved from their official Brand Assets page)

A little-used online gaming store called Green Man Gaming released a hotly debated metric for its consumers last week: Average Cost Per Hour. According to Matt Kim from US Gamer, the metric is determined by the price of the game at the time someone views it divided by the average number of hours Steam connected users of Green Man Gaming have played the game. It goes without saying that, as a statistical measure, this metric is highly flawed. For one thing, this a volunteer sample and is not at all representative of all players of the game. It’s not even representative of Green Man Gaming players of the game which might be a more helpful metric considering that consumers using Green Man Gaming may share goals and perspectives. For another, Steam hardly, if ever, accurately tracks the amount of time a player spends in game and using current price as opposed to the price when purchased ignores the impact of investment on motivation to play. I can’t be the only person who’s spent more time in a game simply because it was more expensive for me. The list of qualms with this particular metric could run through this entire article, but instead of talking about how bad this particular version of the metric is for games, as was done in practically every major article covering it, I’d rather discuss how an average cost per hour metric could be useful.

I know what you’re thinking, “Useful? How could something that practically every major article believes distorts our understanding of a game’s value be useful? Doesn’t it harm developers and encourage the inclusion of time padding in otherwise succint and engaging experiences?” and yes, it does do all those things… in its current form on Green Man Gaming and in our current gaming culture. But have some imagination, this metric serves an obvious purpose! Not every gamer has a limitless pool of financial resources, and gaming is already far more expensive and specialized than practically every other entertainment medium out there! Finding ways to make gaming more accessible, like the explosion of the mobile market did, is critical for games to continue to develop as an artform. Yes, that’s right, more consumers and producers will make games a more mature artform, so giving an accurate average cost per hour metric could bolster our communities and platforms. There are many ways you could alter a flat average cost per hour into something more helpful.

Green Man Gaming - Stats and Facts
(Image credit to Green Man Gaming, retrieved from their official Moonlighter product page)

Why not, for instance, create a value based rating system as opposed to a nebulous review score structure? The calculation for this rating system would be Appraised Game Value = Hours Enjoyed × Personal Cost Per Hour and Value Per Hour = Appraised Game Value ÷ Hours Played. For example, let’s say you bought a $60 game that you’ve played for 20 hours but every hour you played was abysmal and you regret the time and money you spent. That game’s really worth $0 after your appraisal, so the value per hour (what the game should cost) comes out to $0 an hour. If you enjoyed all 20 hours of the game, that’s a $3 value per hour, and if you enjoyed 15 hours of the game that’s a $2.25 value per hour.  A value per hour rating system could then be compared with a cost per hour metric to aid in purchasing decisions. This eliminates the issue of cost per hour being used as a value system, and the meaningless “out of ten” reviews we’re all familiar with. This rating system also leaves room for higher order recommendations in the form of impressions, ordered lists, full scale analyses, etc. by separating the consumptive value of a game from its artistic merit.

Now on to fixing that pesky cost per hour metric. First off, self reporting is wildly inaccurate and Steam counts hours spent downloading and updating software in proprietary launchers, adjusting settings in menu, and many other superfluous moments into its record. What a cost per hour metric requires is an in-game timer like the one in Pokémon games and an “Are you still playing?” stop screen like the one used on Netflix. This wouldn’t eliminate every problem and is obviously a far way off (good luck trying to standardize all that) but it would drastically improve our data quality. Once we had that improved data collected in a publicly accessable forum, all sorts of demographic information could stratify the data according to the users needs. Imagine a Spotify style Discovery playlist that suggests games to you based on the playing habits of those with a similar library or similar favorite games! Imagine a specialized, social media style feed that performs a similar function. That, however, is beyond the point. Users could select which consumers to include in a cost per hour analysis or defer to an algorithmically generated analyis that matchs the user to those with similar tastes or view the full analysis that includes every player in the system. Each of these choices would give valuable information, but the order in which they’re arranged is important. I believe the default cost per hour metric should be blank and request you add users to track and only give the full player base or algorithmic analysis upon request. This would disuade the use of such a subjective measure of the game as objective and improve the metric itself as users develop it to reflect their own desires. Certainly a metric like that would be integral to purchasing decisions and celebrated/critiqued into fitness!

Despite all this, it is important to remember that even a value per hour score doesn’t relate every bit of critical information on a game. For a player, playing a game is like eating food. Appraised value and value per hour are to games almost what calorie content is to a meal. In both cases, that metric is terribly important for those with little to spend and degrades as a measure of utility as financial resources swell. Other methods of games criticism tell us more nuanced information like which ingredients were used, where those ingredients came from, how their flavors interact, and more, but no food critic has ever bemoaned a calorie count for degrading the value of their assessments. We shouldn’t let our critics either.

Besides, they must be a little impressed… Why else would they give a little-recognized retailer such great publicity coverage?

Birb Friends Review: Shadowrun Returns (PC)

Shadowrun Returns Title Screen
Image credit to Harebrained Schemes, retrieved from the official Shadowrun Returns Steam page.

Shadowrun, as a setting and a world, has always fascinated me. A pulpy mixture of Tolkienesque high fantasy and the gritty noir flavor of Gibson’s cyberpunk, what else could an angsty adolescent male want? That is, besides a way to insert himself into that world without 50d6, vacant mouthbreathing stares, and that one decking player that always stalls the game for everyone else. (You know who you are…)

SR5 Cover Book
Image retrieved from the Shadowrun Tabletop Media Kit.

That’s right, Shadowrun is a tabletop RPG from back when the medium was in its prime. The first edition Shadowrun ruleset was released in 1989 and presented a world relentlessly steeped in the pop literature traditions of the time. Filled with quirky lingo like “chummer,” fantastical racial slurs like “dandelion eaters” (it’s for elves, if you were curious), and slang for new technological developments like “trid” (holographic 3D television), rereading the Shadowrun ruleset for the fifth time was a surefire way to impress your friends and immerse yourself in early 90’s cyberpunk.

At least it was if you were me… in middle school. I’ll confess, I exhausted every possible outlet for Shadowrun roleplaying that didn’t require social interaction. From the black ASCII screens of old school MUDs to the terrible first person shooter that made its way onto the scene in 2007, nothing filled the empty hole in my heart for Shadowrun. That’s why I, like so many others, was elated when the Kickstarter campaign was launched. A genuine Shadowrun CRPG complete with Steam Workshop support for a virtually limitless stream of content? Push that drek out, chummer! Shut up and take my credsticks!

The Streets of Seattle
Image credit to Catalyst Game Labs, retrieved by Birb Friends.

In terms of gameplay, it’s a pretty standard turn-based RPG with a classless progression system taken straight from the tabletop game. It’s sleek, slim, and easy to understand so I won’t explain it here, but it’s not revolutionary, and it’s not exciting. Some design choices also slow and detract from the experience, like how clearing a combat area doesn’t always return you to the exploration movement mode, so your characters have to individually scramble. That’s not to mention the fact that this game, a mystery game about underworld espionage and infiltration, has no dedicated stealth system… so there’s that. The game’s systems are hardly ever turned on their heads, and when they are it’s often more frustrating and stalling than anything else. Despite a variety of character builds being available, most will feel the same to the player, because player agency is practically nonexistent in terms of narrative progression. That’s not to mention that some builds are far superior to others because of a design choice made in the last few hours of the game! Don’t play a shaman. Seems like a fun idea, isn’t really worth it. Diversify in a few different attributes, and have some fun with the combinations. That’s where the system shines.

As for the narrative, it’s stock. Full of archetypal characters with no deviation, even less motivation, and average character growth if any at all. If you thought Bioware was the king of bland, you haven’t met developer Harebrained Schemes yet. Of course, this is their first outing, but pushing more funding and development into the narrative would have helped this game more than anything else. There’s only one consistent companion, Coyote, in the game, and while they’re complete, they aren’t interesting. To make Shadowrun Returns’ short story shorter, your buddy Sam kicked the bucket but the campaign’s eponymous “Dead Man Switch” triggers with the message that he has money if you can get to the killer. In need of the cash, you go through a few twists and turns along the way, say hello to familiar faces in unfamiliar places, then realize that the most interesting parts of this story happen elsewhere – without you. I’d comment on the use of symbolism, metaphor, et cetera, but it’s either so on the nose you might as well be a Proboscis monkey, or just not there. As interesting as the setting could be, this is not a tale to sweep you away.

The Seamstresses' Union
Image credit to Catalyst Game Labs, retrieved by Birb Friends.

Shadowrun Returns falls especially flat in the narrative department because of its often excessive, flowery, and purposeless walls of text. I understand that not every game can be voice acted, especially one made on a Kickstarter budget, but it would have helped push things along and draw my attention in a more immersive way than what I got. The music is passable but only passable. You’ll find no sweeping beautiful arrangements in Shadowrun Returns, just dingy electrified beats in songs reused as much as the syllable “du” in Darude’s Sandstorm. As for the graphics, they’re vibrant and often varied, but stereotypical for the cyberpunk genre. Occasionally, a setpiece will attract my eye, but never for more than a few moments. Beyond that, the character models look like something straight out of 2006, and their animations, with every character hunching awkwardly as they shuffle to the designated spot, aren’t much better. Still, everything in Shadowrun Returns is perfectly functional.


FINAL VERDICT
Shadowrun Returns Header
Image credit to Shadowrun.com’s Shadowrun Returns media page.

Shadowrun Returns is a run-of-the-mill tactical turn-based CRPG with a lackluster whodunnit narrative and everything else to match. Its greatest strength is its intriguing setting and its greatest weakness is how little time it dedicates to exploring and giving life to that setting. $15 is a little steep if you only plan to play the Dead Man’s Switch campaign, but with comprehensive modding tools, there’s plenty more to explore. That being said, Shadowrun Returns was followed by two successors that most agree are far superior, so before you buy, consider picking up Shadowrun: Dragonfall or Shadowrun: Hong Kong instead.


49/100 – Failing…

Steam Sale Snatches!

It’s hard to escape the rush of the Steam Summer Sale. Every year thousands of gamers spend their hard earned cash on digital downloads in the hopes that they’ll find some diamonds in Steam’s mountains of rough. With only $8.00 in my hands, I may have found some hidden gems, but these games are only what you make of them. Enjoy!

Best of Show – FTL: Faster Than Light
  • Sale Price: $2.49
  • Current Price: $9.99

Yes, I know what you’re thinking. It’s not just borderline criminal that I’ve slept on this game for five years, it’s an intergalactically recorded hate crime that warrants an entire rebel fleet on my tail in the most faithfully science fiction and brilliantly realized Rogue-ish game on the market. In Faster Than Light, you’re the captain and crew of the Kestrel, or the Torus, or whatever spacecraft you desire as you flee the Rebel fleet with valuable information for the Federation. It’s like playing as the Tantive IV, if Darth Vader was a series of drones, invaders, and hull fires, and Leia Organa was a Starfleet captain. Filled with classic sci-fi set pieces like derelict spaceships brimming with fungus, distress signals from failing space stations, many other lifeforms including mantis and robotic peoples, and more, FTL is a science fiction experience unrivaled even by the likes of No Man’s Sky and Elite: Dangerous. Although minimal on the graphics side of the things, Faster Than Light delivers on great space adventures in a way no other game I’ve played has. If you haven’t heard of this game already, you must be living in the Outer Rim, and at $2.49 it was well worth the purchase price.

Underexposed Nostalgia Trip – Powernaut VANGARDT

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  • Sale Price: $0.49
  • Current Price: $1.99

I managed to find Alex Hall’s little ode to the Gameboy era of punishing platformers while scrolling through the lowest priced games in the Steam Summer Sale. Powernaut VANGARDT takes design, narrative, and visual elements from games as successful as Metroid, Mega Man, and Dark Souls and repackages them into an inconspicuous bundle of raw nostalgia. Spiky enemies, doors to each room, and spaceship bases should immediately remind players of Metroid, but the “lemon” and charged attacks coupled with the difficulty scream Mega Man to me. That’s not to mention the Dark Souls cloned DNA system (with DNA instead of Souls and home ships instead of bonfires) that allows the player to customize their abilities a bit for the road ahead and also helps them make sense of the open world the game is set in. From inputting game save passwords without the help of the keyboard, to nail biting but entirely fair platforming segments that made me die time and again, Powernaut VANGARDT took me many years back to playing Gameboy in my grandmother’s basement. The excited drive that leads to thumbing through cheat booklets for password codes and failing despite their aid rushed back, and I played Powernaut VANGARDT for hours until I beat it’s first boss: a big ol’ spider. P. S. Bring a can of Raid to Skaridurk Woods; you’ll need it.

Arcade Diversion – Handsome Mr. Frog
59655812b90ce605359111
(Image credit to Cowboy Color, retrieved by Birb Friends via nVidia GeForce Experience capture)

 

  • Sale Price: $0.49
  • Current Price: $0.99

Handsome Mr. Frog was another bargain bin catch. It’s a Mario Bros. style arcade platformer with a Yoshi/Kirby gulp and spit mechanic that plays quite well with the jumping. To defeat the enemies you can pick up crates or other enemies and spit them towards each other, but the level design is underwhelming and at some points seems downright lazy. Regardless, there’s something undeniably charming about that handsome frog. You can collect hats along the way and there are little items that boost your score (there is a competitive leaderboard) but that’s about all. Handsome Mr. Frog was a cute and enjoyable diversion worth the $0.49 I paid for it, but I don’t think its revolutionary. In fact, most of the games on this list are derivative instead of inventive…

Platforming Meets Lateral Thinking – Tiny and Big: Grandpa’s Leftovers
  • Sale Price: $0.99
  • Current Price: $9.99

Now this is inventive! Tiny and Big: Grandpa’s Leftovers has a ridiculous Adventure Time-esque premise with a post-apocalyptic setting and a young inventor searching for his grandfather’s pants. The fun cartoon style doesn’t help the resemblance to Adventure Time and even the handheld gaming simulations felt a little too Beemo to me. Beyond that, the addition of a laser cutting tool to help you make platforms, a rope to pull them, and a rocket to push them means incredible physics/platforming challenges can await! I haven’t played much of the game just yet, but from what I’ve seen it’s at least worth the money I paid and maybe even the standard price! If you love 3D platformers, Adventure Time humor, and you’re looking for a new IP, this might be your game.

Walking Simulators, Now In 2D! – Beeswing
  • Sale Price: $0.49
  • Current Price: $4.99

Beeswing is a walking simulator set in the game designer’s rural home town in Scotland. The whole game is drawn on paper with what appears to be marker that, set against an often foreboding soundtrack, gives the game an uneasy atmosphere. I’ve played about 30 minutes of Beeswing and I still don’t know what to make of it. The conversations that take place in game are more revealing and psychologically angled than most other games which gives them a sort of depth uncommon, or perhaps more often unnoticed, in everyday talk. Walk around the place, read some flavor text, and solve some of the townspeople’s problems. There doesn’t seem to be much else to do! It’s a coming home story not too unlike Night in the Woods, and there’s definitely something to enjoy here for the right people.

What did you think of my finds? What did you buy this Steam Summer Sale? Let me know in the comments below! See you next time, Birbies!

Birb Friends Review: Attack the Light (iOS)

Attack the Light is a light RPG for iOS and Android that’s set in the Steven Universe… universe… and has gameplay similar to the Paper Mario series. In the game, you’ll move around 5 different color themed worlds as you literally “attack the light” monsters that exist there. The game was released in 2015 by Grumpyface Studios to critical acclaim and will be followed up shortly by Save the Light, a console RPG for modern systems with similar gameplay, a wider world, and 8 characters to choose from for your party of 4. Attack the Light is available for the measly sum of $2.99.

To detail my experiences with Attack the Light, I’ve prepared a scoring system in which certain aspects of the game are weighted more than others. I’ve separated the system into two primary scores: Technical Proficiency and Artistic Proficiency. Each score will be explained below and numerous subscores from which they are derived will be supported with qualitative evidence. Please note that all scores are out of 100 and 50 is the benchmark for the average title on the market. A 50 is NOT a bad score, it’s an average score.

Available Now - Attack the Light
(Image credit to Grumpyface Studios and Cartoon Network Games, retrieved from Grumpyface Studios official blog)
Technical Proficiency: 69/100

Technical Proficiency is a combined score composed of three main scores: Visuals, Sound, and Controls. This score is meant to detail the spectacle of the experience and how well the sensory artists and programmers crafted the game.

Overall Visuals Score: 69.5/100

Garnet's Gauntlets - Attack the Light
Garnet squishes a bug with a mighty punch. (Image credit to Grumpyface Studios and Cartoon Network Games, retrieved from Attack the Light’s official iTunes page)
  • Style Score: 40/100
  • Animation Score: 74/100
  • Purpose Score: 82/100

Steven Universe has a very particularly style. It’s hyper shaded backgrounds with their sparing diversity in color, chalked outlines, and ornate geometric texturing could only come from Steven Sugar himself… or perhaps a 90’s magical girl anime. Attack the Light takes these pieces of art, and the simpler art of Steven Universe’s character design, and throws them in the frying pan, rendering them down until all the fat is off and only the essentials remain. While we are reunited with certain locales from the early episodes of the show, it’s not enough to bolster what the art lost. In the end, while Attack the Light’s style feels remarkably true to the show design, it’s visuals are bland and fails to catch the eye or remain in the memory very long. Enemy design suffers from the same lack of detail, and falls prey to the same fate. For this reason, Attack the Light receives a 40/100 as its style score.

Attack the Light’s animations fair considerably better. Each of the Crystal Gems express themselves in a direct match with their television counterparts, giving needed character to the experience. The many attacks that the Gems can use against the light enemies are varied and interesting as well. Their timing feels just right as you tap the screen to secure bonuses for each ability. Enemies have similarly pleasing animations. Ramming beetles, stinging scorpions, puffing fish, and burrowing moles are just a few of the light creatures that make an animated appearance. While Attack the Light could always have better animations, they’re good enough to earn a 74/100 in the animation category.

With Attack the Light’s Paper Mario styled, turn based, reflex action combat it’s very important that the player can see what’s happening at all times. If they can’t see, they won’t be able to react properly to the game! Luckily, the simple style of Attack the Light means that every interaction is plain to see. What’s more, a large star that surrounds the character an attack targets appears right before the player has to reactivate their ability to clearly communicate that to the player. When characters are injured, poisoned, burning, or otherwise, they take on varied stances and colors to let the player know as well. My only misgiving in terms of visual purpose is the reused room layouts. Some room designs that previously lead to another area from certain directions may not in a different context. This can be frustrating with out a map function. That being said, the small, helpful additions (as well as the proper animations) give Attack the Light an 82/100 in the visual purpose category.

Overall Sound Score: 48.89/100

  • Music Score: 50/100
  • Sound Effects Score: 45/100
  • Variety Score: 60/100

I’ve often described Steven Universe as what Dragonball Z would have been if it was also a musical about life. You wouldn’t know that from this score, which is quite the disappointment (or reason for rejoice, depending on your viewpoint). Attack the Light has a synth heavy, standard soundtrack with no particularly outstanding tracks. Light and sweet, the music captures what made Steven Universe tick in its earlier seasons but it fails to open up towards the emotional and developmental heights the show has now reached. Aivi and Surasshu are talented composers who’s work, along with show creator Rebecca Sugar’s, has made Steven Universe one of the shows to watch for all ages. Grumpyface composer Dustin Bozovich didn’t quite pull that off for Attack the Light, but it’s a fine soundtrack all the same. For that reason, it receives a 50/100 as its music score.

While most of the sound effects in Attack the Light are not only functional but whimsically representative of Steven Universe and allusive to its mythos, many begin to grate on my nerves after playing for awhile. I can only stand to hear the words “Cheeseburger Backpack!” enthusiastically proclaimed so many times in a row before I turn the sound effects off. Quips of the same nature find there way out of each character’s mouth until, before you know it, you’re swimming in Steven Universe fan-pleasing soup and you can only eat so much. The sound effects are functional and some, such as Garnet’s punch, are even reminiscent of older, crunchier sound times when computers couldn’t handle the power characters were dishing out. For this, Attack the Light receives a 45/100 in the sound effect category. Excessively harsh? On my ears, maybe.

As for variety, most of the sound effects are fairly similar which caused a repetition issue. The music, on the other hand, has enough diversity to lift the sinking ship. Some tracks have low bass components, others have distant guitar riffs. I would have like even more variety however, but with a length of only 6 hours the game can only pack in so much. For these reasons, Attack the Light receives a 60/100 in the aural variety category.

Overall Controls Score: 87.22/100

Purple Puma Pound - Attack the Light
The Purple Puma drops a bow on an angler fish as Garnet stands shocked at his prowess. (Image credit to Grumpyface Studios and Cartoon Network Games, retrieved from Attack the Light’s official iTunes page)
  • Controller Score: 85/100
  • Responsiveness Score: 100/100
  • Functionality Score: 80/100

Attack the Light is a mobile game and, like most mobile games, can only be controlled by touch. From my experience with Attack the Light, the touch screen of a sixth generation iPod Touch worked well enough for the experience. On other devices, the touch screen may not be as receptive and functional a controller. I couldn’t help but think that a controller with a d-pad would have given me a cleaner experience with less input mistakes. Despite that, Attack the Light can be played to completion with the touch controls without much hassle. For this it receives an 85/100 as its controller score.

In an action oriented game like Attack the Light, its important that there’s as little lag between the player’s input and the game’s action as possible. From my experiences, any lag time between the player input and the game action is negligible and has no impact on gameplay. This may vary on less powerful devices or if you are running the Android version of the game. For these reasons, Attack the Light receives a 100/100 for its responsiveness score.

There were some issues in terms of functionality with Attack the Light’s control scheme. At some moments, I found it hard to select Pearl, in particular, because of her slender figure. The touch I meant to activate an ability on Pearl would then cancel that ability and force me to begin the procedure of choosing the ability and Pearl again. With repetition, this was frustrating but it did not impair playability as selection happens within an untimed turn selection period. Selecting the small ability buttons, especially those close to other characters or the corner of the screen, also proved more difficult that I would have liked. These issues didn’t ruin the functionality of the game for me, but they were frustrating and for that Attack the Light receives an 80/100 as its control functionality score.

Soundtrack Artwork - Attack the Light
(Image credit to Grumpyface Studios and Cartoon Network Games, retrieved from Grumpyface’s Attack the Light soundtrack Soundcloud album)
Artistic Proficiency: 67/100

Artistic Proficiency is a combined score composed of two main scores: Gameplay and Story. This score is meant to detail the meaning of the experience and how well the writers, directors, and designers crafted that meaning into the game.

Overall Gameplay Score: 70/100

Praise the Gem - Attack the Light
Steven fits a red gem into a door to open a secret path. (Image credit to Grumpyface Studios and Cartoon Network Games, retrieved from Attack the Light’s official iTunes page)
  • Agency Score: 80/100
  • Core Gameplay Loop Score: 68/100
  • Variety Score: 50/100

Attack the Light doesn’t allow for player agency to impact the story direction, but it does have a lot of options to choose from in terms of customizing and fitting the Crystal Gems into specific combat roles. At each level up, the player can choose what to upgrade for the Gems, whether it be their base stats (attack, defense, luck, and Harmony which is the health stat), one of their existing abilities, or a new ability. Players can also give Gems badges they’ve collected on the way. Badges give Gems special perks to augment their stats, give them immunity to certain conditions, increase their damage against certain enemies, and more. Beyond this, players can also find level up items that can level up a Gem without having to battle. This, along with the dialogue choice system, lets players choose which Gem they think needs to be the strongest for the task at hand. In dialogue, you make decisions on how to approach scenarios, and based on your response, certain Gems will receive experience. This a fun way to let you customize the Gems efficiently, but also to let you role play as Steven. What would he say? Overall, Attack the Light earns an 80/100 in the agency category.

The core gameplay loop of Attack the Light is: warp to a world, explore the world for chests, keys, gems, and memory puzzles, run into an enemy (through ambush or attack), defend and heal with Steven while damaging with the Gems, defeat the enemy, continue exploring the world to find another warp. The smaller battle loop has you using abilities, which cost stars (Steven supplies 5 stars at the beginning of each round, and unused stars roll over), using items that either heal the Gems, give them battle buffs, or give bonus stars, and defending against enemy abilities. While attacking and defending, tapping the screen when stars appear gives extra damage or prevents more damage. It’s all fairly intuitive once you get into a rhythm, and the discovery involved in how you can chain abilities and make the most out of your stars is rewarding. Exploring the world, however, grows very stale. Despite the addition of collectables meant to reward the player for slowing down and taking the world in, their isn’t much to see in the world. Eventually, you’ll be rushing by; you’ll flick screen after screen of Attack the Light’s grid based navigation system (it reminds me of an old first person dungeon crawler or newer games like Legend of Grimrock) without actually seeing anything. Attack the Light is still engaging and fun, but it doesn’t change the Paper Mario formula much at all. For that it receives a 68/100 in the core gameplay loop category.

Variety is utterly lacking in Attack the Light, but nobody would expect a mobile game to be expansive. Regardless, I would have like to do more in the Steven Universe… universe, while I was in the game. Where’s Steven’s dad? Could he have given Steven something to help him along the way? Connie would love to help the Gems, so where is she? Helping out at the car wash, book shopping with Connie, and grabbing a doughnut from Sadie and Lars, are just a few of the activities I would have loved to undertake in game. Steven Universe is a show about life, so why shouldn’t Attack the Light be an RPG about life, too? For a standard level of variety and an engaging level of depth, Attack the Light receives a 50/100 in the gameplay variety category.

Overall Story Score: 64/100

Locked Out Beat Up - Attack the Light
Stephen makes a tough decision about how locked doors should be tackled. (Image credit to Grumpyface Studios and Cartoon Network Games, retrieved from Attack the Light’s official iTunes page)
  • Characters Score: 60/100
  • Plot Score: 32/100
  • Coherency Score: 100/100

Judging by Attack the Light’s presentation of Steven Universe’s nuanced, growing characters you’d think they’re nothing but the archetypes they originate from. In fact, it’s hard for me to judge how Attack the Light characterizes Steven, Garnet, Amethyst, and Pearl because, as a fan of the show, I know these characters very closely. There certainly isn’t too much character development happening over Attack the Light’s six hour run time, though, and for that I fault it. It seems material that would normal inhabit a 10 minute long episode of the show has been stretched so thin that the characters, no matter how many quirky references they make and perhaps because of those references, are cardboard cutouts of themselves because of it. For this I give Attack the Light a characters score of 60/100. Why higher than 50? Perhaps playing Attack the Light will leave you wanted more and lead you straight to the show. Then, the characters would be much better for you.

Attack the Light begins with the Gems returning from another unknown mission with a special prism that, in the hands of a powerful Gem, could spawn an entire light army! With some prodding from Amethyst, the other Gems let Steven get ahold of the prism, and, sure enough, a light army, split in different colors, flies forth and now you have to put them back. It’s a simple premise that doesn’t evolve much over the course of the game. There are no subplots, no new threads to a grand puzzle, just some punching generic baddies until Steven saves the day in the end. It’s almost non-existent and for that, Attack the Light receives a 38/100 in the plot category.

Despite the fact that the characters are underdeveloped and the plot is non-existent, Attack the Light knows that it’s just a mechanical RPG and it’s okay with that. After all, Steven wanted to play an RPG, so he got to play an RPG. It didn’t need to be complex or interesting. Nothing in the experience seemed out of place or like it shouldn’t have been included. Attack the Light is a coherent experience that seems finished, albeit empty. For this, it receives a 100/100 for its coherency score.


FINAL VERDICT

Logo - Attack the Light
(Image credit to Grumpyface Studios and Cartoon Network Games, retrieved from Attack the Light’s official Google Play page)

Grumpyface’s Steven Universe RPG isn’t the best RPG of its kind, turn to the Paper Mario games (The Thousand-Year Door would be my suggestion) for that. It isn’t the best representation of the characters or the world either, but it is a great way for fans of the show and Paper Mario-style RPGs alike to get their fix. Hopefully Save the Light, a new console game made by Grumpyface and set after Attack the Light, can rectify some of the issues and bring us the game Steven Universe deserves. With more playable characters and the setting of Beach City, Save the Light looks like it’s on the right path. Until then, get your fix with Attack the Light for $2.99 and help Steven keep the Harmony. It shouldn’t be too hard; he already keeps Beach City weird.


68/100 – Good.

Birb Friends Review: The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild (Wii U)

The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild is the sixth 3D installment of Nintendo‘s beloved Legend of Zelda franchise and a follow up to 2011’s Skyward Sword. Releasing on the Wii U and Nintendo’s new console, the Switch, Breath of the Wild sparked the same kind of joyous fervor that every new Zelda game musters. Heralded as a return to the “open air” design sensibilities of the original Legend of Zelda, Breath of the Wild is an open world adventure game with environmental puzzle solving elements. Contrasting with its most recent predecessor, Breath of the Wild is almost entirely free of linearity, giving the player the freedom to approach problems however they want. That being said, the story and meaning behind the game seems ambiguous and empty because of it.

To detail my experiences with Breath of the Wild, I’ve prepared a scoring system in which certain aspects of the game are weighted more than others. I’ve separated the system into two primary scores: Technical Proficiency and Artistic Proficiency. Each score will be explained below and numerous subscores from which they are derived will be supported with qualitative evidence. Please note that all scores are out of 100 and 50 is the benchmark for the average title on the market. A 50 is NOT a bad score, it’s an average score.

The Legend of Zelda - Breath of the Wild Logo
(Image credit to Nintendo, retrieved from their official Zelda site)
Technical Proficiency: 83/100

Technical Proficiency is a combined score composed of three main scores: Visuals, Sound, and Controls. This score is meant to detail the spectacle of the experience and how well the sensory artists and programmers crafted the game.

Overall Visuals Score: 89.25/100

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  • Style Score: 87/100
  • Animation Score: 90/100
  • Purpose Score : 90/100

Breath of the Wild’s visual style is very reminiscent of Skyward Sword albeit cel shaded and less saturated this time around. Low color saturation coupled with very basic textures and high quality lighting effects causes many areas and materials to appear claylike in game. This is far from a bad thing however, and sets the tone for many of the playful and creative interactions to come. Beyond that, Zelda’s style is faithful to the previous installments with intricate gothic designs flooding the Zora Domain with cool colors, mysterious yet utterly human adobe structures rising from the Gerudo’s sands, primitive and searing stacks of stone radiating beneath the Gorons on Death Mountain, and towering wooden huts spiraling up rock spires for the Rito. Even beyond the four races, each linked to an aspect of Hyrule through both their divine beast and specific stature (water, earth, fire, air), there are many beautiful Hyrulean vistas inspired by real life locales. Marshes, forests, snow capped mountains, plateaus, and more exist in this game. Filled with stunning lighting and particle effects that could only live in a Zelda game, Breath of the Wild receives a 87/100 for visual style.

From leaping Lizalfos to slumping Hinoxes, galloping horses to flying herons, every animation in Breath of the Wild shows an incredible attention to detail that you’d be hard pressed to find anywhere else. Many open world experiences of its magnitude have countless animation bugs and glitches but during my playthrough, I not only failed to encounter a single one but also spent far more time watching animations than I ordinarily would have. Guardians in particular entranced me with their multiple legs moving in unison and flailing as they burst in blue flames. Nothing in Breath of the Wild feels stiff or lifeless, and for that it receives a 90/100 in the animation category.

There was never a time while playing Breath of the Wild that I felt the game hadn’t told me what was about to happen. From enemies reeling back to swing, shoot, and lob, to lines of electric energy on the ground, everything the player needs to know is visually related to them. Each collectable item even has a helpful sparkle small enough not to cause frustration but visible enough to help you find every bit of loot at your disposal. Map pins and markers are also available to give extra clarity to the location of places seen easily from a height but impossibly on the ground level. Leaves, cracked rock, the classic red barrels, and lustrous metal clues the player into the options they have when approaching any given situation. For this, Breath of the Wild receives a 90/100 in the visual purpose category.

Overall Sound Score: 79.33/100

  • Music Score: 79/100
  • Sound Effects Score: 77/100
  • Variety Score: 90/100

After the fully orchestrated soundtrack of Skyward Sword, fans of the Legend of Zelda’s memorable and soaring themes might find themselves disappointed with Breath of the Wild’s mostly minimal piano riffs and entirely synth based soundtrack. Nonetheless, Breath of the Wild’s music is full of memorable themes such as the swelling and anticipatory main theme, the frantic brass piercings of the Hinox battle theme, and the ponderous and heavy movement of the Talus battle theme. Despite this, Breath of the Wild’s musical strength comes from its sensitivity to the player’s actions. If Link is trying to keep quiet, the music will die down to add tension to the moment. If Link is approaching battle, the music will shift to a thematically appropriate theme for that enemy. Because of Breath of the Wild’s lackluster music (in comparison to previous Zelda titles), it receives a 79/100 in the music category.

Similar to the quality of animation in Breath of the Wild, sound effects abound with such a high attention to detail that I’ve yet to play a game that rivals them. From horses panting and clopping with each clop ringing in your ears at the exact moment a hoof strikes Hyrule, to shattering weapons and ticking guardian lasers, every sound effect you hear lets you know about your surroundings. Breath of the Wild develops a world so realized that each animal has a specific set of sounds as the leaves rustle and fall from the trees. Ambient and gameplay sounds are only one half of the equation though, and the voice acting is monstrous. It seems that a mostly talented voice cast working with less than direct translations received sub-par directing for their lines. Misplaced emphasis, awkward tone qualities, and much more could have been eliminated from the performance with a simple request for another take with different directions. For this reason, Breath of the Wild receives a 77/100 in the sound effects category.

In terms of variety in sound, Breath of the Wild is on very stable footing. Short piano riffs coupled with swelling brass movements and airy flute melodies meant that newer digital styles and older traditional Japanese styles could exist side by side. Most tracks present a different theme, from pentatonic desert meanderings for the Gerudo, to ethereal and soothing piano pieces for the Zora, soundtrack variety was not relinquished from the Zelda formula this time around. Coupled with the wide variety of sound effects for any occasion, Breath of the Wild earns a variety score of 90/100.

Overall Controls Score: 80/100

Guardian Wallpaper - Breath of the Wild
(Image credit to Nintendo, retrieved from their official Breath of the Wild media page)
  • Controller Score: 80/100
  • Responsiveness Score: 100/100
  • Functionality Score: 68/100

Breath of the Wild is playable with a Wii U Pro controller or the Wii U Gamepad but the Gamepad is required for some gyroscopic gameplay sections within shrines. This fact coupled with the frustration of an odd control scheme and no remapping options gave Breath of the Wild a bit of a learning curve and a pressure for the player to play on the Gamepad exclusively. I played on the Wii U Pro controller for the majority of my game, but I would suggest the Wii U Gamepad if gyroscopic aiming seems beneficial to you and you don’t want to have to switch controllers during play. Despite that, the Wii U Pro controller worked flawlessly after the initial learning curve. Breath of the Wild receives an 80/100 for its controller score.

Lagging inputs, disconnections, and incorrect responses were absent from my experiences with Breath of the Wild, though this may differ if you intend to play on the Nintendo Switch with the Joy Cons disconnected from the system. Dodging, firing arrows, jump attacking, and much more all felt smooth in my playthrough. For these reasons, Breath of the Wild receives a 100/100 in the responsiveness category.

Breath of the Wild’s menus are odd to say the least. While most menus use a bumper systems to move between tabs, Breath of the Wild opts to force you through each page within a tab to get to the selection you want. Another frustration with Breath of the Wild’s controllers is the lack of a drop weapon button (this is particularly true for shields and bows, as melee weapons can be thrown), which forces you through the menu any time you want to pick up a new item. Receiving the notice that your inventory is full from a chest and not being given an immediate option to drop items is flabbergasting in this day and age. Another qualm with Breath of the Wild’s functionality comes from its wavering frame rates which drop for unknown reasons in many of the early areas and stutter when fighting Moblins or lighting large fires. For these reasons, Breath of the Wild receives a 68/100 in the functionality category.

Promotional Artwork Wallpaper - Breath of the Wild
(Image credit to Nintendo, retrieved from their official Breath of the Wild media page)
Artistic Proficiency: 74/100

Artistic Proficiency is a combined score composed of two main scores: Gameplay and Story. This score is meant to detail the meaning of the experience and how well the writers, directors, and designers crafted that meaning into the game.

Overall Gameplay Score: 89.67/100

Lizalfos Concept Art - Breath of the Wild
Lizalfos are one of the most common enemies in Hyrule. (Image credit to Nintendo, retrieved from their official Breath of the Wild media page)
  • Agency Score: 84/100
  • Core Gameplay Loop Score: 96/100
  • Variety Score: 75/100

Breath of the Wild is a game largely about exploration, but that does not necessarily mean it has a lot of choice within it, or that it gives the player agency within its parameters. In this case, the journey is far more important than the destination as “all roads lead to Rome” which for Link is the final boss, Calamity Ganon, inside Hyrule Castle. To take on the many enemies now patrolling Hyrule, Link has a variety of damaging abilities to choose from, but some, such as bombs, quickly become obsolete when enemies have higher resistances in harder areas. Collecting and seeking out the many ingredients that grow in Hyrule allows the player to explore cooking and create dishes and potions to further customize their playstyle. Player agency is at its greatest in the many shrine puzzles that line the landscape and in the four divine beasts that serve as Breath of the Wild’s main dungeons. There the player can think laterally to solve puzzles in ways the designers may not have intended, and are encouraged to do so. Sadly, the most interesting story in Breath of the Wild took place before the events of the game, so the player has little agency or interaction with it. For these reasons, Breath of the Wild receives a 84/100 in the agency category.

Breath of the Wild holds within it many separate gameplay loops that can be undertaken at any time during play. The first is the exploratory loop: find the map revealing tower, reveal a region of the map, use the Sheikah Slate sensor to find shrines in the area, find a new map revealing tower, repeat. The second is the main storyline loop: find a city belonging to one of four major races (Rito, Zora, Goron, Gerudo), complete a preliminary quest in which you are introduced to the new champion of that race, go to the divine beast, activate all the terminals in the divine beast by solving puzzles using its unique movement mechanic. There are other loops as well, such as the Great Fairy clothing upgrade loop, the cooking loop, the breakable weapons loop, et cetera, but these two are the most important. The shear scope of these intertwining loops gives Breath of the Wild an inviting, constantly changing, and rewarding gameplay cycle full of reflex/timing driven interactions and thoughtful but intuitive stat assignment. For this Breath of the Wild receives a 96/100 in the core gameplay loop category.

Games typically consist of one central gameplay theme or dabble slightly in many. Breath of the Wild is a perfect balance between those two styles. While it has fully formed puzzles as clearly presented and thoughtfully designed as (but more free than, in terms of possible solutions) those in Valve’s Portal series, it also contains rigorous combat against 18 unique enemy types complete with dodge, parry, knockback, freeze, shock, and burn mechanics that will keep the player on their toes. This is not to mention the horseback riding, gliding, climbing, and much more. Coupled with side quests of all shapes and sizes, from finding the hiding places of the forest Koroks, to recruiting people of all kinds to join together in a new village, Breath of the Wild offers a lot of variety to work with. For this reason, Breath of the Wild receives a 75/100 in the variety category.

Overall Story Score: 58/100

Champions Wallpaper - Breath of the Wild
The former champions of Hyrule stand ready. (Image credit to Nintendo, retrieved from their official Breath of the Wild media page)
  • Characters Score: 60/100
  • Plot Score: 50/100
  • Coherency Score: 64/100

The characters of Breath of the Wild are archetypal at best and never develop past that base level of nuance. The four previous champions, Revali the Rito, Daruk the Goron, Mipha the Zora, and Urbosa the Gerudo, are all the simple archetype of their race; in the previous order, each Champion’s primary trait would be arrogant (skillful), worried (diligent), selfless (compassionate), and controlling (vengeful). We seldom interact with them and all the meaningful interaction Link has with these characters takes place before the events of the game and out of our control. I would like to say that the defeat of each character at the hands of Calamity Ganon was due to the deficiencies of their archetypes but we are never presented with the events surrounding their demises. As for Link and Zelda, Zelda feels she is incompetent in her destined mode and so seeks her own way to contribute, eventually realizing the constraints she must work within to succeed. Link, alternatively, worked within his constraints and so is the true hero of the story, albeit a mute and blank one. Despite this each have interesting visual designs and many homages to previous games raising the character score to a 60/100.

Breath of the Wild takes place in a Hyrule that has seen Ganon rule in a pure calamitous form for 100 years. The Great Calamity, the event in which Ganon rested control of the many mechanical Guardians and the four divine beasts that were meant to defend against him, took the life of Hyrule’s King, the four Champions, and nearly took the life of Link who was put to sleep in a resurrection shrine until he could fight again. Now that he has awakened, Link must complete the shrines dotting the landscapes to increase his power, free the four divine beasts from Ganon, and recover his memories before putting an end to Ganon in a final confrontation. Link’s memories run the pre-Calamity storyline in which the Champions, Zelda, and Link prepare for the return of Ganon. Zelda struggles with envy at Link’s acceptance of his destiny until she gains her own power through protecting Link. I could break down the symbolism behind both storylines but each is a form of the hero’s journey most would be familiar with, either from old heroic tales and myths, or the religions of many cultures. No particularly nuanced or creative statement is made with the story so Breath of the Wild receives a 50/100 for its formulaic offering.

Sadly, there is a major disconnect between the story of the game and the story of Zelda’s memories. Not to say this wasn’t purposeful, but I personally would have preferred if the pre-Calamity storyline took place within a linear progression so that we could see more character progression within the champions and get to know them personally. Then whenever we are truly alone in the open world environment of the game, the feeling of freedom can be a frantic and crushing experience as well as an empowering one. That change, coupled with a less successful Calamity age Hyrule would have greatly improved the game as a coherent product. Nonetheless, Breath of the Wild is slightly above par what most would expect in terms of polish and understanding of itself and for that it receives a 64/100 in the coherency category.


FINAL VERDICT

Box Art - Breath of the Wild
(Image credit to Nintendo, retrieved from their official Breath of the Wild Wii U product page)

Despite a less than perfect storyline, lackluster music given the series’ fame, and some UI and frame rate issues, Breath of the Wild stands out on the merit of its gameplay systems  and attention to detail alone. With gorgeous visuals and sound effects, each romp in Hyrule’s vistas will be a spectacle to behold and lead the player to something new. In the future, I hope that Zelda stories can take on the mechanical and narrative complexities they’ve held in the past while retaining the benefit of the open ended design used in both Breath of the Wild and the original Legend of Zelda. For $60, Breath of the Wild may not be the best game on the market, but at $40 or less it’s a great adventure that puts the player in the role of the Hero of Hyrule as they grow in power to a satisfying end. Open your eyes… adventure awaits.


78/100 – Great!